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Posts Tagged ‘carleton film society’

Why hello there friends, it’s been a while. Just stopping by to tell you about a SUPREMELY AWESOME film society event going on tomorrow night. The evening’s lecture and screening come courtesy of everyone’s favourite film-turned-Canadian Studies prof, the one and only André Loiselle!

Prof. Loiselle will be giving a one hour lecture about his bread-and-butter subject: the Quebec horror film. The film he’s selected to screen is the 2010 Le poil de la bête by Philippe Gagnon.

This is a lecture we’re all pretty excited about and we hope to see you all there!

The man, the legend:

The film trailer:

The lecture & screening will cost $2 at the door for non-members.

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Hey there pals & gals,

Let’s get down to business first…
This Friday (October 22) at 6:00 sharp we’ll be listening to your pitches for the library project. We’d like you to have at the very least, a written synopsis for your project. If you have a screenplay too, bring it. Make sure you bring 3 copies of whatever you’ve got (one for you, one for us and one for the library’s board of directors).

If you can’t make it on Friday, but you’ve got a gem, you can e-mail it to us, but we must (I repeat MUST) have it by Friday at 6:00. Again, please have at least a synopsis written out. It’s up to us Execs to relay your idea to the Library Big-Wigs, so give us all you can to convince ’em that your short is the one that should get made.

Now that THAT’s out of the way…

This week, we’re teaming up with our friend’s from The Moose & Pussy, Ottawa’s only literary erotica magazine, for a screening of ‘”Cloud Nine”. Made in 2008, it;s a German film about about a woman who enters into an affair after 30 years of marriage.
As Jeff Blackman (one of the mag’s editors) puts it, “it’s proof your grandparents still do it, and do it well.”

Since this is a fundraiser for The M&P, there will be a $2 cover at the door BUT that includes all-you-can-eat popcorn! PLUS you can read their magazine online for FREE right here! http://www.themooseandpussy.com/

SO, in summation, please come to 400 St. Pat’s at 6:00 to pitch your idea for the Library Shorts. Please come at 7:00 for a screening with our friends from the Moose & Pussy.

Yeah!
-Christine

Here’s our caveat: CFS is a safe space. If the film makes you uncomfortable, please excuse yourself. We’re all adults so let’s keep it cool and fun.

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I don’t know about you, but I love Gwenyth Paltrow. She always ends up in movies I want to see and even if the film disappoints, her performance is stellar. A little while ago, she started a blog for Yummy Mommies (you know, the SUV stroller wielding, Lululemon pant wearing, Starbucks sipping ladies who trounce around the Glebe like they own the place). It’s called GOOP, which is probably an acronym for something. Most of the posts are about somewhat superficial, jet-setter , parenting things, but I stumbled across something you would only get from an actor of her calibre. She asked a few of her friends to list their top 5 favourite films.

Just a hint, her friends include Wes Anderson, Sofia Coppola & Steven Spielberg. You can read the list here:

http://goop.com/newsletter/25/en/

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Hello everyone and welcome to Film Society 2010/2011!

Maybe the number of exclamatory sentences in this post is too high for you, but it clearly illustrates how excited I am to get the ball rolling for film society this year.

This is just a friendly reminder that our first meeting of the year is this Friday, September 17th at
6:00 in room 400 of St. Pat’s. We’re going to be getting to know all of you a little better, so come prepared to tell us what you want to get out of film society this year or what you think you might want to
do later in the year.

We’re also going to be screening our challenge entries for the month of September. It’s not too late to get started to make your challenge entry. Remember: the theme is ‘Summer Vacation’. Show us what you did (or didn’t do), what you hope to do next year or something along those lines. Challenges should be 2-5 minutes or so and burned onto DVD for
screening ease. If you have any questions, just shoot us an e-mail.

We’ll be screening the fantasy/comedy/detective bonanza ‘Who Framed Roger Rabbit’ (directed by Robert Zemeckis and produced by Steven Spielberg) at 7:00. It single-handedly saved Disney from bankruptcy and also marks the first (and so far, the only) time in animation history that Mickey Mouse and Bugs Bunny appeared on screen together.

Here’s the trailer:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OzuXjep6pbs&feature=related

So, in short, I hope to see you all on Friday at 6 with challenge
entries in hand (there’s a prize for the winner!) and some ideas for
what to do this year.

Until then!
-Christine Sirois, el Presidente

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Now that the weather is finally starting to cool off, it’s time to start thinking about joining us for another year. Membership for the whole year is $10 and that will get you into all of the workshops and screenings that we host PLUS super bonus extras that will be divulged as the month unfolds.

We’ve already announced the first challenge theme for the year: “Summer Vacation”. Show us what you did (or didn’t do) in your time off. Challenge films are due at our first meeting of the year on September 17th at 6:00 in 400 St. Pat’s. There will be a prize for the best short and bragging rights are always sterling.

There won’t be a workshop per se, but we execs are really interested in what you all want to get out of this year and what kind of stuff you want to see more (or less) of at meetings. We’ll be screening Who Framed Roger Rabbit that night too.

It’s gonna be some good, clean film society fun, so come on down and bring all of your friends.

See you soon!

-Christine

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Next week is the big hurrah to our weekly meetings, and you know what that means… Oh, you don’t? Well nOObz, it means that we will be choosing our execs and president for the 2010/2011 year. Exciting ain’t it?

Remember: it’s not just about the glory. It is actually a fair amount of work. You have to plan stuff and work with CUSA (which is a lot of work in and of itself) but you also get to hang out with cool people and totally geek out about films and stuff too.

If you think you’re the right candidate for the job, come on down to 400 St. Pat’s next Friday and tell us why. It’ll be great. We’ll watch a movie and maybe go for drinks after. Alright? Cool.

Until then (but possibly before),

-Christine

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Here are 2 stories from the CBC in the last few days.

Very special features

Why the Criterion Collection DVD label is heaven for film buffs

To die for

Look what’s on the menu at Montreal’s Fantasia film festival

BLAM!!!

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Hey there guys and gals,

Here’s a little last-minute update about this week’s meeting.

First of all, yes, we are having one. Secondly, we’ll be giving you all of the info you need in order to put together a pitch for your screenplay. We’ll be having an open call for pitches at our first meeting back after winter break (Friday January 8th), so now is your big chance to ask us all of those questions that have been marinating in your brain all semester.

As for the screening, we’re showing Garth Jennings’ 2007 film ‘Son of Rambow’, in which a few British schoolboys set out to make their own version of Rambow: First Blood. Clocking in at a timely 98 minutes, this film is a good excuse to get your nose out of the books for a short-but-nice send-off before everyone parts ways for the break. Yeah!!!

Also, don’t forget to film your holiday shenanigans for your shot at Film Society Glory in our December challenge.

See you tomorrow!

Unimaginatively yours,
-Christine

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Hey sons and daughters,

Below are a few questions to assist a critical analysis of  4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days. While reading you might notice that I say that “Mungiu”, and not “the film”, does this or that. I encourage you to think of directors as the true authors of films, even though doing so always opens up a big ol’ can of worms. For example: Is director Arthur Penn the “artist” of Bonnie and Clyde, or was hands-on producer and star Warren Beatty more responsible for the film’s form and content, the final product? (It’s said that Beatty was the architect of crucial scenes, including the ultra-violent finale.) While such conundrums of true authorship– if it’s even possible in film– may discourage you from endorsing a “cinema of directors” in academic contexts, on our blog and at CFS meetings I encourage you to place all emphasis on the director’s credit, for the purposes of categorizing and humanizing films. So let’s talk about what Mungiu is doing (to great effect, I believe) in 4 Months in the same way we talk about what Quentin Tarantino “does” in any of his films, ‘kay?

How would you describe the camerawork? When are you most strongly reminded that someone is manipulating the camera? Do you think this is intentional? If so, what purpose is served by the camera being “present”?

How are scenes framed? On average, what is the distance of the camera to the actors? How often are close-ups used? When Gabita and Otilia are talking, are their conversations presented in conventional “shot/reverse-shot” fashion? Are the (physical) distances between characters important to each scene? What techniques does Mungiu use to emphasize them?

Does Mungiu employ elaborate or glamorizing lighting? Why or why not? Is the set design carefully considered?

How abrupt are the scene changes? Are there on-screen actions that anticipate a cut from one scene to the next, or from one locale to the next? (Pay special notice to the first 20 minutes.)

In which scene (or scenes) is sound– not dialogue–most important to the telling of the story? How does the audio being amplified contribute to the particular feeling these scenes are meant to evoke?

How is colour used within the film? Is there a colour which stands out– a motif? If so, what ideas, feelings or themes does it connote?

How is Otilia treated throughout the film? What sort of tone do the “adults” take with Gabita and Otilia’s boyfriend? What distinct societal differences are being portrayed? How might they be split? What is the general mood of the film? Do you think we are meant to compare it with a specific mood or atmosphere enveloping Romanian life at this time?

Hopefully there are enough humdingers and brainbusters in there to cultivate a Saturday night of quiet study and sober reflection. If you wish to respond or comment on the film, the Internet allows you to do so below.

See you next week!

Scott, Gaddafi of CFS

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